What to Do If Your Menstrual Cup is Hurting

Is your menstrual cup hurting? Here are some reason why.

Experiencing pain when you use a menstrual cup can be a deal breaker. Although there are so many other benefits that come with switching to a menstrual cup, the most important thing is that you feel comfortable on your period!

When inserted correctly, your JuJu should not cause you any discomfort. But if you do happen to experience some discomfort with using your JuJu cup, don’t despair. Here are some of the reasons why your menstrual cup could be hurting and ways to fix it.

What causes pain when using a menstrual cup?


Problem: Wrong size

If you’re wearing a cup that is too big or long for your body, it could be sitting too high up in the vagina or pressing hard on the vaginal walls, causing pain and discomfort (including cramps).


The solution: Measure your cervix and take our quiz to help select the right size for your body. Regardless of age, some people find that they will need to select the smaller Model 1, particularly if they have strong pelvic floor muscles, have an intact hymen or have not had vaginal intercourse.


Problem: The stem is too long for your anatomy

If you have a shorter vaginal canal or a low cervix, you may find that the stem of your cup is protruding outside of the vagina and causing irritation - ouch!

The solution: An easy fix is to trim the stem of your cup using a pair of clean scissors. If your cup is still too long and the base is protruding outside your body, you may need a shorter Model 4 JuJu cup.


Problem: Not inserting properly

It can take a few cycles to get used to inserting your JuJu, and you can view our full list of insertion tips here. Inserting your cup too high into the vagina can cause discomfort, and if your cup is sitting next to your cervix rather than beneath it, you will likely feel pain straight away. If your cup is pressing against your cervix, it may also cause a dull achy pain.

The solution: When inserting your cup, allow it to pop open lower down in the vagina, then gently push it up into place. Your cup should sit lower than a tampon and be positioned directly below the cervix, never against it or beside it.


Problem: It is too big to insert

One of the most common reactions we hear when people are first introduced to the concept of using a menstrual cup is “that’s too big, how will I get it up there?!” However, if you use the right fold, the tip of a menstrual cup becomes not much bigger than the diameter of a regular tampon to insert!

Regardless, if you are “tighter” down there, have an intact hymen or have not had vaginal intercourse, inserting a menstrual cup can still seem a little intimidating.

The solution: Experiment with different folds (the “punch down” fold is one of our favourites for making your cup as small as possible) and don’t be afraid to use some personal lubricant on the rim of your cup when inserting. If you have never had vaginal intercourse, click here to read our best tips for using a menstrual cup for the first time.

What to do if you’ve tried it all

When inserted correctly and provided it is the right size for you, your JuJu should not cause any discomfort. But for some people, this simply isn’t the case. If you have tried the tips above and are still experiencing discomfort, please stop using your menstrual cup and seek advice from your medical practitioner.

Our bodies are all different. In some cases, you may find one particular brand of menstrual cup works better for your anatomy than another. People with a tilted uteruspelvic organ prolapse, poor pelvic floor tone or other health conditions may find that menstrual cups simply don’t agree with their anatomy.

If you feel like you’ve tried it all and are still experiencing pain with your menstrual cup, the good news is that there are still other comfortable, eco-friendly and cost effect ways to manage your period. Cloth pads or period underwear are both fantastic reusable alternatives for those who experience discomfort when using a cup.