Everything You Need to Know About Periods

It can feel like a momentous occasion when you get your first period. But for many, periods can also be confusing and frustrating. What are all these things happening down there? And how do you deal with your periods effectively?

Don't worry; we're here to help! 

In this post, we'll tell you everything you need to know about periods. We'll answer all your questions and give you some helpful tips on managing your period effectively. 

So read on, and learn everything you need to know about periods!

What is Menstruation?

Menstruation (or period) is the loss of blood and tissue from the uterus. Every month, your body prepares for pregnancy. If no pregnancy occurs, the uterus lining is shed through the vagina.

What is the Menstrual Cycle?

The menstrual cycle is from the first day of your period to the first day of your next period. The average menstrual cycle is 28 days, but it can range from 21 to 35 days. Menstrual cycles can be irregular, especially in the first few years after starting menstruation or during menopause.

Menstruation: Signs & Symptoms 

The most common sign of menstruation is bleeding from the vagina. It usually lasts for three to seven days. Menstrual bleeding is usually heaviest on the first day or two of your period. Other symptoms may include:

  • Cramps 
  • Bloating (feeling full)
  • Breast tenderness
  • Headaches
  • Fatigue (tiredness)
  • Mood swings
  • Backache

The 6 Stages of Menstruation Cycle!

stages of mensuration cycle

The menstruation cycle has 6 stages, and we have covered all of them in detail below:

Stage 1. Menstruation: Uterine Cycle

During menstruation, the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) is shed through the vagina. 

It is caused by hormonal changes in the body that prepare the endometrium for pregnancy. If no pregnancy occurs, the endometrium is no longer needed and is shed through menstrual bleeding.

Stage 2. Follicular Phase: Ovarian Cycle

The‌ ‌follicular‌ ‌phase is ‌the first ‌phase of ‌the ovaries' cycle. It begins with your first day of menstruation and ends when you ovulate (release an egg)‌ ‌from‌ ‌the‌ ‌ovary. 

At this stage, a pituitary gland is released that stimulates and increases the production of follicles in the ovaries. 

One follicle will mature more quickly than the others and release an egg during ovulation. 

The follicular phase typically lasts about 14 days.

Stage 3. Proliferative Phase: Uterine Cycle

The proliferative phase is the second stage of the uterine cycle. It begins after menstruation and ends when you ovulate. 

During this phase, the pituitary gland releases a hormone which is known as the follicle-stimulating hormone that stimulates the growth of the uterus lining.

The proliferative phase typically lasts about 10 days. 

Stage 4. Ovulation: Ovarian Cycle

This usually happens around the middle of the cycle, but it can change from cycle to cycle. ‌Ovulation ‌‌separates the two phases of the ovarian cycle (known as luteal and follicular phases, respectively).

It occurs in the middle of the menstrual cycle, about 14 days before the start of your next period.

Stage 5. Luteal Phase: Uterine Cycle

The luteal phase is the second stage of the uterine cycle. It begins after ovulation and ends when you get your period. 

The corpus luteum (the sac of fluid that remains after ovulation) produces progesterone during this phase. This hormone prepares the endometrium for pregnancy.

 If no pregnancy occurs, the corpus luteum degenerates, and progesterone levels drop. It causes the endometrium to break down and menstrual bleeding to occur.

The luteal phase in your menstruation cycle typically lasts about 14 days.

Stage 6: Secretory Phase: Uterine Cycle

Progesterone continues to be produced by the corpus luteum during pregnancy. This hormone helps maintain the endometrium and prevents menstrual bleeding from occurring. 

If the egg is not fertilized, the corpus luteum degenerates, and progesterone levels drop. It causes the endometrium to break down and menstrual bleeding to occur.

The secretory phase typically lasts about 14 days.

Common Questions About Periods!

Now you are aware of all the stages of menstruation. But still, some common yet uncleared questions about periods might bother you. Just because of this, we have covered most of them below:

What Do Menstruators Feel During Their Periods?

Most girls have their first period when they're around 12 years old. But it can start as early as 8, or it might not show up until you're 15 or older—everyone is different.

If this seems new to you, then don't worry at all. 

Plenty of other girls are probably in the same boat. According to a study from the U.K, nearly half of all girls don't even know they're having a period until it shows up on their underwear.

Even though it might seem icky, menstrual blood is completely natural and nothing to worry about. 

It's just blood and tissue inside your uterus (womb) that exits your body through your vagina. 

Think about all the other things that come out of your vagina like discharge, sweat, or pee — and menstrual blood is really not a big deal.

Why Do You Feel Pain and Cramps When You're On Your Period?

girl feeling period cramps

There are a few key reasons you may experience pain and cramps when you're on your period. The first is due to the shedding of the uterine lining. This process can cause inflammation and irritation in the tissue, leading to pain.

Another reason for period pain is the contraction of the uterus during menstruation. These contractions help to expel the menstrual blood and tissue from the body. 

However, they can also cause cramping and pain.

Finally, some women experience an increase in prostaglandins during their period. Prostaglandins are hormones that can cause the uterus to contract. They can also cause inflammation and pain.

Is Period Pain and Cramps Normal?

Yes, period pain and cramps are normal. Many women experience them every month. The contraction of the uterus causes period pain as it sheds its lining.

The pain can vary from mild to severe. Some women also experience other symptoms, such as bloating, mood swings, and fatigue.

Verdict!

So there you have it, everything you need to know about periods! We hope this article has been informative and that it will help you as you navigate your period journey. 

Remember, every person’s experience with their period is unique, so don't be afraid to ask your doctor or other healthcare professionals for advice if you need it. And most importantly, stay focused on finding your healthy happiest self!

It can feel like a momentous occasion when you get your first period. But for many, periods can also be confusing and frustrating. What are all these things happening down there? And how do you deal with your periods effectively?

Don't worry; we're here to help! 

In this post, we'll tell you everything you need to know about periods. We'll answer all your questions and give you some helpful tips on managing your period effectively. 

So read on, and learn everything you need to know about periods!

What is Menstruation?

Menstruation (or period) is the loss of blood and tissue from the uterus. Every month, your body prepares for pregnancy. If no pregnancy occurs, the uterus lining is shed through the vagina.

What is the Menstrual Cycle?

The menstrual cycle is from the first day of your period to the first day of your next period. The average menstrual cycle is 28 days, but it can range from 21 to 35 days. Menstrual cycles can be irregular, especially in the first few years after starting menstruation or during menopause.

Menstruation: Signs & Symptoms 

The most common sign of menstruation is bleeding from the vagina. It usually lasts for three to seven days. Menstrual bleeding is usually heaviest on the first day or two of your period. Other symptoms may include:

  • Cramps 
  • Bloating (feeling full)
  • Breast tenderness
  • Headaches
  • Fatigue (tiredness)
  • Mood swings
  • Backache

The 6 Stages of Menstruation Cycle!

stages of mensuration cycle

The menstruation cycle has 6 stages, and we have covered all of them in detail below:

Stage 1. Menstruation: Uterine Cycle

During menstruation, the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) is shed through the vagina. 

It is caused by hormonal changes in the body that prepare the endometrium for pregnancy. If no pregnancy occurs, the endometrium is no longer needed and is shed through menstrual bleeding.

Stage 2. Follicular Phase: Ovarian Cycle

The‌ ‌follicular‌ ‌phase is ‌the first ‌phase of ‌the ovaries' cycle. It begins with your first day of menstruation and ends when you ovulate (release an egg)‌ ‌from‌ ‌the‌ ‌ovary. 

At this stage, a pituitary gland is released that stimulates and increases the production of follicles in the ovaries. 

One follicle will mature more quickly than the others and release an egg during ovulation. 

The follicular phase typically lasts about 14 days.

Stage 3. Proliferative Phase: Uterine Cycle

The proliferative phase is the second stage of the uterine cycle. It begins after menstruation and ends when you ovulate. 

During this phase, the pituitary gland releases a hormone which is known as the follicle-stimulating hormone that stimulates the growth of the uterus lining.

The proliferative phase typically lasts about 10 days. 

Stage 4. Ovulation: Ovarian Cycle

This usually happens around the middle of the cycle, but it can change from cycle to cycle. ‌Ovulation ‌‌separates the two phases of the ovarian cycle (known as luteal and follicular phases, respectively).

It occurs in the middle of the menstrual cycle, about 14 days before the start of your next period.

Stage 5. Luteal Phase: Uterine Cycle

The luteal phase is the second stage of the uterine cycle. It begins after ovulation and ends when you get your period. 

The corpus luteum (the sac of fluid that remains after ovulation) produces progesterone during this phase. This hormone prepares the endometrium for pregnancy.

 If no pregnancy occurs, the corpus luteum degenerates, and progesterone levels drop. It causes the endometrium to break down and menstrual bleeding to occur.

The luteal phase in your menstruation cycle typically lasts about 14 days.

Stage 6: Secretory Phase: Uterine Cycle

Progesterone continues to be produced by the corpus luteum during pregnancy. This hormone helps maintain the endometrium and prevents menstrual bleeding from occurring. 

If the egg is not fertilized, the corpus luteum degenerates, and progesterone levels drop. It causes the endometrium to break down and menstrual bleeding to occur.

The secretory phase typically lasts about 14 days.

Common Questions About Periods!

Now you are aware of all the stages of menstruation. But still, some common yet uncleared questions about periods might bother you. Just because of this, we have covered most of them below:

What Do Menstruators Feel During Their Periods?

Most girls have their first period when they're around 12 years old. But it can start as early as 8, or it might not show up until you're 15 or older—everyone is different.

If this seems new to you, then don't worry at all. 

Plenty of other girls are probably in the same boat. According to a study from the U.K, nearly half of all girls don't even know they're having a period until it shows up on their underwear.

Even though it might seem icky, menstrual blood is completely natural and nothing to worry about. 

It's just blood and tissue inside your uterus (womb) that exits your body through your vagina. 

Think about all the other things that come out of your vagina like discharge, sweat, or pee — and menstrual blood is really not a big deal.

Why Do You Feel Pain and Cramps When You're On Your Period?

girl feeling period cramps

There are a few key reasons you may experience pain and cramps when you're on your period. The first is due to the shedding of the uterine lining. This process can cause inflammation and irritation in the tissue, leading to pain.

Another reason for period pain is the contraction of the uterus during menstruation. These contractions help to expel the menstrual blood and tissue from the body. 

However, they can also cause cramping and pain.

Finally, some women experience an increase in prostaglandins during their period. Prostaglandins are hormones that can cause the uterus to contract. They can also cause inflammation and pain.

Is Period Pain and Cramps Normal?

Yes, period pain and cramps are normal. Many women experience them every month. The contraction of the uterus causes period pain as it sheds its lining.

The pain can vary from mild to severe. Some women also experience other symptoms, such as bloating, mood swings, and fatigue.

Verdict!

So there you have it, everything you need to know about periods! We hope this article has been informative and that it will help you as you navigate your period journey. 

Remember, every person’s experience with their period is unique, so don't be afraid to ask your doctor or other healthcare professionals for advice if you need it. And most importantly, stay focused on finding your healthy happiest self!